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think if president obama had inherited bill clinton's economy, a surplus. that wasn't the case. so i think the president needs to remind america where we were and where we have been and the accomplishments that we've made. as far as mitt romney is concerned, romney can go after president obama all he wants tonight. he's got some serious repair work to do after the 47% comment, because that was a real snapshot as to who he is. plus, his private sector experience has got a checkered past. he's an outsource iceoutsourcer. he's a guy who's gone to the bottom line who hasn't been good to middle class families. he can't put a number on how many jobs he's actually created. but we hear these testimonials more and more all the time because of the hardship the middle class has gone through because of the economic model he presented in the private sector. that is a huge target for the president tonight, and i think he'll exploit it. >> steve schmidt, from a republican perspective, looking at that plus 19 number that president obama has got on handling issue of the middle class, how does mitt ro
below the mason/dixon line. and the right still lamb upons hillary clinton for trying to put on an accent. politicians on both sides do that. >> roland martin what do you make of this obama video? >> i think it's utterly laughable that sean hahnity, daily caller and the rest of these folks are making this out to be significant. something written on june 7, 2007, was a headline i wrote on cnn.com. obama's quiet riots are real. >> quiet riot is a phrase he used in this very speech. >> no, no. i was referencing the speech he gave to the hampton minister's conference. here is the deal. talk about the amount of money spent on the gulf coast. alabama, mississippi, okay? is this going to have any impact on this election? absolutely not. this is nothing more than sean hahnity's infan situation with reverend jeremiah wright, pure and simple. >> is there a significance to this you believe? >> i think that there is no material significance here, but the republicans are very good at taking nothing and turning it into what appears to be something. we have to remember that we live in a cou
committee today sent a letter to the state department asking for answers in person from secretary clinton, leveling serious allegations including these, the attack quote, was clearly neve as administration officials once insisted, the result of a popular protest. more damningly, this, quote, multiple u.s. federal government officials have confirmed the committee that prior to the september 11 attacks, the u.s. mission in libya made repeated requests for increased security in benghazi. the letter goes on to detail a series of attacks and incidents in libya that formed the basis for those calls for more security resources, resources that the letter alleges were denied by officials in washington. we'll have more on that angle shortly. first, arwa damon joins me. she's back from libya and joins me here in new york. very good to see you safe and sound. walk me back. you were at the site three days after the attack. you have some still photographs that have never been seen before. describe what we see. >> well, the first in these photographs is basically the exterior of the main building at the
who wins the first debate. >> the day after, victory for perot. clinton hold his own. trouble for the president. there's no one scorecard for determining who won and who lost last night, but a consensus does seem to be emerging. ross perot, the star of the night because no one knew what to expect. bill clinton just good enough. and president bush, he'll have to do much better. >> by morning, what had been last night's analysis had become conventional wiwisdom. in the headlines. on the "today" show. >> clinton did what he had to do and bush did not. >> and in instant polls. >> those polls show the president finishing third among people who watched the first debate. >> the bush people are getting very, very tired of hearing that the president did not hit a home run last night. >> so at this point as a nation, in our entire history as a country, we have had four national attempts of a challenger making his television debate debut against the sitting president of the united states. and after doing this four times as a nation, the record for incumbent presidents facing these challe
show rounds. you might say why wasn't it hillary clinton. the man who died worked for her. she is the secretary of state. does that add to the intrigue here as to why the ultimate person in charge wasn't going out? >> well, i think susan rice kind of got the short straw here. hillary clinton, i think our own candy crowley can attest hillary clinton doesn't do talk shows often. i think hillary clinton has been doing this a really long time and knows what it looks like is not going to be what ends up being true, even the next day or in the end. it was caution on her part she wasn't the one and there are those who think she was put in a bad position. >> thank you very much. "outfront" tonight, the chairman of the house intelligence committee and good to see you. appreciate you're taking the time. obviously, now hearing as elyse has been able to confirm there were a decision made. and given to the american people. why did that happen? >> well, i can't say why, but that's incredibly disturbing information. this was not barack obama's ambassador, the democratic am boss darr. it was t
the panel for the clinton global initiative. they are lloyd blankfein, the chairman and ceo of goldman sachs, andrew liveris, the president, chairman and ceo of dow chemical, and john chambers, the chairman and ceo of cisco. the conversation was fascinating. listen in. >>> lloyd, let me start with you. when you look at the global economy, right now, you know, what is it, four years after the crash, what does it look like to you? >> well, we're definitely in a muddle-through phase, slow growth, very disappointing. but i think one of the things that was achieved -- and by the way, in hindsight it may look small but while we were living through it, it was very large. there was a substantial chance too substantial to live with of things falling off the rail. they're still out there, and a lot of the things that would foster growth are still uncertain and are still, you know, frankly they're still in the forward. but i think what was taken off the table recently by the -- frankly by the central banks acting by themselves and less by government through fiscal policy was the real blow-up risk. so i
's struggled with the art of persuasion, the art that bill clinton obviously mastered so well. so there, i think there is a weakness for him in the debate, that he has a sort of, he can stumble too, not in the same way that romney can, but he can sort of get tangled up in his slightly professorial style and lose the plot, if you will. >> important as this may be to the romney fortunes, it's a day we discover the romney campaign is planning to unleash, this is their leaking, robust spending in the final five weeks of the campaign. quotes from a republican source, we will spend as much in paid advertising, direct mail and field operations in the next five weeks as we have spent since becoming the presumptive nominee. this is from a mail by spencer zwick, the campaign's national finance chairman and mason fink, the national finance director for the campaign. they will be chucking the financial commercial advertising kitchen sink at the president, and the president's not ahead in the polls, really. most of them, he's just ahead or they're pretty level. >> but you're looking at the national pol
democratic that gets elected, it was illegitimate. and then clinton comes along, he's illegit. you had it with kennedy. dead people in chicago really elected him. then clinton came along. he did win. i would think there was this notion that bill clinton was inherently illegitimate and nothing too extreme to dislodge him from the white house because he was de-facto illegitimate. and i think with barack obama, this notion that this could not have happened. this was a nightmare inflicted on us by a.c.o.r.n. >> you are so funny. you have the cartoon sense, the way they look at this. a bunch of people got together. the idea that somehow it doesn't belong to the democrats and bill clinton went to russia when he was a kid, he's some sort of mole, some sort of mata hari. and even kennedy -- why do they think illegitimately, why does the white house belong in the hands of the toris, if you will, the conservatives? >> because i think it's symbolic. they feel the symbol of the country has got to represent the symbol of the values, pushing what they see is the american value system, which is capit
. the breakthrough came through the 14th primary face-off when asking hillary clinton about eliot spitzer's plan to give driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. >> do you support his plan? >> tim, this is where everybody plays gotcha. it makes a lot of sense. what is the governor supposed to do? he's dealing with a serious problem. >> i was confused on senator clinton's answer. i can't tell whether she was for it or against it. parts of leadership is not just lo looking backwards and seeing what's popular or trying to gauge popular sentiment. it's about setting a direction for the country. >> the president is best what he's able to sharpen his responses and throw a punch. he was able to elevate himself in the debates with john mccain in moments like this one. >> in a short career, he does not understand our national security challenges. we don't have time for on the job training, my friend. >> senator mccain in the last debate and today again suggested i don't understand. it's true. there are some things i don't understand. i don't understand how we ended up invading a country that had nothing
's not the way. it's all small ball stuff that. worked for bill clinton because bill clinton had a raring economy so he could worry about school uniforms and talk about small stuff. where is i the president's big plan? >> where's mitt romney's small plan? >> you heard it last night. he has an entitlement reform plan, tax plan, corporate tax plan, energy plan, trade plan. the president doesn't. and i think it really showed. he imagined he was going to get through this race simply by disqualifying romney. they almost did it during the summer. they came this close. >> hold on a second. >> i want to ask you something. the whole debate last night was obama saying no to romney's agenda. we all learned romney's agenda. nobody learned obama's agenda. now he's going back to negativism. this is a huge mistake. let me tell you something else romney did to get reaction. your man obama is going to have so much trouble. romney said to 68 million viewers, i can make a deal. i can go across the aisle like i did in massachusetts. in fact he even said about his tax reform plan, if you don't like the specific versi
four years, given what he was handed in this, when you heard bill clinton say that, bill clinton has not said that before. >> i could have done better. you could have done better. i think anybody who wasn't ideologically driven could have done better. >> what would you have done? >> sorry? >> the meaningful steps. >> what wouldn't you have done. >> we need jobs so therefore -- and we need exports so therefore the first thing you do is have the nlrb attack the number one exporter in the country on really preposterous grounds, then you in effect start yelling at business and threatening business and then you get on the tv and talk about las vegas and all of a sudden the hotel business dies. i mean, the answer is that we need leadership, not criticism. we need encouragement not discouragement and until that scenario changes i think the united states is quote/unquote, i hate to use this word, in a malaise. >> is that a function of new laws and legislation or a function of rhetoric? >> first of all it's both, okay, in other words, we hope that it's new laws. the reality is, it isn't new l
, in terms of obama, the great question the democratic presidents have been asking since clinton is, can you get a non-judge on the court? kagen was not a judge, but her background was judge-like. we were discussing earlier, the court that decided the board of education, one of the justices, not one had been a full time judge before. when alida replaced o'connor, they were all federal court judges. that is a terrible lack of diversity. she knew what it was like to raise money. >> she was a former state legislature. a lot of what comes in front of the court are sta chte statutes. >> for the middle. >> citizens united is a case that talks about giving money to campaigns as if it's a first amendment speech driven process. a politician may say, can i tell you what goes on, why people give money to campaigns? >> yeah. >> i would think, if this president is reelected, because there are so few court of appeals judges who are the right age, he will have to look outside the judiciary, which i agree, is a great thing. it's not only understanding how government works, it's understanding people's proble
dramatically since the ryan selection, since medicare, bill clinton's arguments on medicare at the convention, it became central to the discussion, there's been a big shift towards obama in that category. >> this doesn't take medicare off the table. we still have to deal with this. >> you're exactly right. medicare and medicaid are unchecked going to cripple this country. we saw erskine bowles earlier this week in chicago, tom, and i said erskine, isn't it the truth that medicare and medicaid by itself is going to consume every cent that the federal government takes in in 20 years? he said no, that's not true. he said, it's doing it right now. he said, this year alone, in the fiscal year that just ended, every dime the federal government got went to pay medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt. that means everything else that on outside of medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt, we borrowed from china. we borrowed from the saudis, we borrowed. we went deeper in debt. that's unsustainable. and the fact that we're not having that discussion in this camp
clinton as he spoke about clinton's effectiveness. what's going on from your view sitting on the board of cisco, having the experience that you've had at yahoo! tell me how you see the environment changes and where specifically you would expect growth to happen in technology in the next five years. >> well, i think technology in general -- probably the biggest challenge is not so much the social interactions but everybody's talking so much about data. data is very, very hard to mine correctly. so i think you're going to see a push back towards a lot of enterprise apps that really figure out how it get information to the companies so they can actually be more personalized for the user, but easy to say, a lot to do. >> and really quick, on what you're seeing out there, how tough is europe right now for technology? what are you seeing in terms of the global slow down? >> well, europe continues to baffle us in general in technology. it looks like it's getting softer, not stronger. you know, companies that diversified over the past 20 years do make sure they had good portfolios in all the r
people like hillary clinton and john mccain. when he became president, he forgofo forgot the skills. consider after passing the campaign law and telling the american people what it was, persuading it about the merits, he let the republicans do that. now it's obama care and it's unpopular because he let that gap be filled by the opposition. >> john, speaking of that 2008 campaign, one of the things that impressed me and i think impressed a lot of people was not just the mail and the messages and the ads out of the obama campaign, but the actual perception they were running an effective campaign and he was an effective leader because of that campaign. does that typically persuade voters, the perception of a good campaign? >> i think it does. it suggests he can manage a big undertaking because a presidential campaign is large and messy, trust me. he managed it with great success in 2008. beating hillary clinton, coming out of nowhere, defeating john mccain. there were very few mistakes common about bitter and guns and religion in pennsylvania was certainly one mistake. he didn't make v
in office, you know, with bill clinton and george bush and to spend all of this time with george bush at camp david and to do horseshoe throwing, skeet and trap shooting, to sit in the oval office and to listen to his meetings -- >> amazing moments for a guy from -- an unknown kid from austria. >> it's unbelievable, that ride. and the book also deals with the determination and the fanaticism and the competitiveness. and always keeping the eye on the ball. and i even have -- you know, the 15 arnold rules and everything that helped me get through and to get to where i am today. so that is what the book is about. >> whatever you've done in your life, when you've wanted something badly enough, you've tended to get there. you clearly would like to repair your marriage, as you said, to the one and only love of your life really. if maria is watching this, and she might well be watching this, what would you say to her? >> i'd just say sorry for what i've done, you know, and i want to win her back and to hope, even though she talks about forgive ofneness forgiveness, that she really can forgiv
know, the obama campaign, their belief in this, has been since sort of the bill clinton explanation of digging out of this hole, has been that ultimately that last sliver of swing voters is going to say, ok, let's not change horses mid stream. they are making a classic incumbent case of saying, it's not great, but, hey, do you want to start over? and i go back. i remember watching a couple of focus groups. there was one out in nevada with some working women. and one woman said, i'm not happy with obama. i'm not happy with the economy. but, god, i don't want to have to start over. there's this perception. so that to me is a tricky thing for romney. romney has got to sort of make this case that, hey, we're not going to rip everything out by the roots, right, which is of course what some in his base do want to have happen. but i'm going to create a better recovery, a faster recovery. so i think that that's what this 8% means, right? it means he's got to be more nuanced in that argument where the president can simply sit there and make that same case. do you really want to start over? >
are the republican nominee president george bush, the independent russ perot, and governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee. my name is carole simpson. and i will be the moderator for tonight's 90-minute debate. >> 90-minute debate, she says. that is carole simpson then. and here is carole simpson today. once again, the lady in red. carole simpson, amazing seeing you here, 20 years later, welcome. you know, all kinds of history made that night. you and i were talking on the commercial break, people recognizing you all around the world in the 20 years since. and it was unique about that night, the three debaters, not the usual two, you had, my goodness, questions from the audience, you had yourself, you're the first woman to host a presidential debate. just -- if i may, first question, perspectivewise, you presided over history, did you not? >> i did. and that was the most exciting -- it was the pinnacle of my career to be able to moderate a presidential debate that is like every reporter's dream in washington is to have that opportunity. so i was thrilled. and i don't like you talki
and hillary clinton, every third night people said he has to be more aggressive, he has to come after her. it was the same kind of critique of his performance. and it did get more pointed over time, but b, the number one value that the obama team sees as their candidates' chief virtue is his personal likability and they will do nothing to risk that. so this was an intentional strategy -- >> do you think obama gained people tonight? >> i don't know. >> this is about winning. this is a huge election. you can't go out there and say. they want the jugular on this guy. >> i know. but they have -- all i'm saying. i'm channelling them for a moment. i tend to agree more with you. but they have said from the beginning we know the liberals want the jugular but we will not give it to to you. the reason people like this man is because he's not the kind of person who ever goes to the jugular. >> so he left the impression tonight that he's really going to fight when it comes to social security? >> i didn't think so. >> i do think one of the remarkable things about tonight is the fact that the president
given bill clinton's speech and given the bump in the polls and the right track/wrong track stuff has improved. people have sort of come around to thinking that maybe it was a tough four years for anyone. can romney ever make the case that it is still a really bad economy that we're under? this is the worst recession. can he make it without looking nasty? >> i think he's got to make it. i think he's got to get people to look down the road and see the train wreck that's coming. >> not the one we've already had. >> 1.1 trillion in deficits racking up every year. we can run about 200 and keep the debt of gdp constant. which means we have a $900 billion tax increase coming. there's only about $1 trillion of income taxes. these are enormous tax increases that have to come. the president has fought every spending cut that's come along. he has a little bit, $50 billion from seniors and obama care to pay for some of obama care, but the rest of it will have to be covered by cost reduction, which he's fought every step of the way for taxes. >> i wonder, howard, can you -- is it possible to win
's done a better job and including that's president clinton's job, but a better job of saying, hey, this was a deep economic mess, my policies are still kicking in. you've got to give it time. he had more success making that argument than romney has trying to say, no, no, no, obama's policies have made it worse. >> john harwood? >> well, gene, i would say, i think chuck's point is the right one, which is that he's got to connect bad circumstances in the economy to what obama's done. but even more important is connecting something better in the future with his own policies. the idea that tax cuts, which he hasn't been talking about all that much. he barely mentioned them in his convention speech, that's going to produce the kind of growth he's talked about. and as you know, that's not an easy case to make. some of the evidence suggests from the clinton years, it doesn't produce that. >> yeah, i agree, john. i think he does have to make that case, though. he has to make some sort of affirmative case. i really don't think it's enough for romney to point at obama and say he's doing a b
,000 a year, we should go back to the rates we had when bill clinton was president, when we created 23 million new jobs, went from deficit to surplus, and created a whole lot of millionaires to boot. the reason this is important is because by doing that, we can not only reduce the deficit, not only encourage job growth through small businesses but we're also able to make the investments that are necessary in education or in energy. and we do have a difference, though, when it comes to definitions of small business. under my plan, 97% of small businesses would not see their income taxes go up. governor romney says, well, those top 3%, they're the job creators they would be burdened. but under governor romney's definition, there are a whole bunch of millionaires and billionaires that are small businesses. donald trump is a small business. i know donald trump doesn't like to think of himself as small anything, but that's how you define small businesses if you're getting business income. that kind of approach i believe will not grow our economy, because the only way to pay for it without either bu
, need very good writers. and president clinton probably had one of the very best. ma his name is michael walidman, now he heads the brennan center for justice at nyu law school. i'm very pleased co-join the program today from los angeles. michael, thanks for being here. this is a wonderful day to talk to you as we count down to this debate this evening. here is my first question to you, sir, the president of the united states, be it president obama or anybody else, has been sitting in office for nearly four years, the most differential character ever. he's called mr. president by his friends. and then all of a sudden for 90 minutes in front of 50 to 60 million people he can be torn apart. do you have to prepare for all of a sudden that change of existence, that change of environment? >> you're exactly right, ashleigh. there are real challenges for any incumbent president. they have people play music when they walk into a room, it is not a normal existence and very rarely will people ever tell a president to his face that he's dead wrong. so, yes, the debate prep process for an incumbent
that ronald reagan did and, frankly, bill clinton did. hold your principles. be tough. in the end you know you have to negotiate, and that's the only way this country can move forward. that is what president romney will do, and that's the president that people saw potential president that people saw in the next president they saw debating the other night. >> governor strickland, the last few seconds to you. new polls in ohio, is it going to be a closer race than it has been when we see the results come out? >> of course, ohio cannot be taken for granted, candy, by any candidate or either political party. it will be a very close race. i believe because of the president's saving of the american auto industry, which, in fact is related to manufacturing jobs in ohio, and ohio is coming back, and we're grateful for that, but the president deserves in my judgment the lion's share of t the credit for ohio's economy, and its rebound. >> from ohio governor ted strickland. ohio attorney general and former senator mike dewine, thank you both for being here. >>> up next, making sense to the eyebrow raisin
. first he's got to find a way to dent the argument that bill clinton and barack obama made at the democratic convention about how president obama's done as well as anyone could do in turning the economy around the last four years. secondly, he's got to make a positive case with passion, with credibility for his own economic plans, for how he's going to make life better for 100% of americans. third, he's going to have to deal with that 47% video which has really taken a toll on his campaign. he's got to do all those things at the same time. we've seen the history of debates, tyler. it is not easy to fundamentally turn a race around but we have seen from our nbc/"wall street journal" poll that he's within three points nationally. still possible for him to win. got get going down. >> amman, there is some buzz about a plan that romney hs apparently floated for basically a $17,000 cap on tax deductions for americans. explain it. you've crunched the number. what's the headline here? >> tyler, the headline here is that the romney campaign e-mailed me this morning on this. they say
. and by the way, the idea came not even from paul ryan or senator wyden, but it came from bill clinton's chief of staff. this is an idea that's been around a long time. which is saying, hey, let's not see if we can get competition into the medicare world, so that people can get the choice of different plans at lower cost, better quality. i believe in competition. >> jim, if i can just respond very quickly. first of all, every study has shown that medicare has lower administrative costs than private insurance does, which is why seniors are generally pretty happy with it. and private insurers have to make a profit. nothing wrong with that. that's what they do. and so you've got higher administrative costs, plus profit, on top of that, and if you are going to save any money through what governor romney's proposing, what has to happen is that the money has to come from somewhere. and when you move to a voucher system, you are putting seniors at the mercy of those insurance companies, and over time, if traditional medicare has decayed or fallen apart, then they're stuck. and this is the reason why
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)